Two children walk out of their shelter in Dablual in Mayendit County on March 23. Hundreds of people have recently fled Dablual, still under control of opposition troops, because of ongoing fighting and the food crisis. Credit: Albert Gonzalez Farran/The Washington Post

Starving to death: How wars have left 20 million on the brink

Max Bearak and Laris Karklis Washington Post, April 10, 2017

Our world produces enough food to feed all its inhabitants. When one region is suffering severe hunger, global humanitarian institutions, though often cash-strapped, are theoretically capable of transporting food and averting catastrophe. But this year, South Sudan slipped into famine, and Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen are each on the verge of their own. Famine now threatens 20 million people — more than at any time since World War II. As defined by the United Nations, famine occurs when a region’s daily hunger-related death rate exceeds 2 per 10,000 people. See full story

Note:  Conflict arises when one group wants to overthrow the existing government in order to take control of the government and use, to substantial degree, the resources that the government has for its own ends.

Caption and credit for above photo: Two children walk out of their shelter in Dablual in Mayendit County on March 23. Hundreds of people have recently fled Dablual, still under control of opposition troops, because of ongoing fighting and the food crisis. Credit: Albert Gonzalez Farran/The Washington Post

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