Oppression and Exploitation News August 1 – 7

Discrimination

Minutes before El Paso killing, hate-filled manifesto appears online Tim Arango, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Katie Benner New York Times August 3, 2019

How a brutal race riot shaped modern Chicago Adam Green New York Times August 3, 2019 (Opinion)

Obtaining income through the government 2019

Tainted pork, ill consumers and an investigation thwarted Matt Richtel New York Times August 4, 2019
Drug-resistant infections from food are growing. But powerful industry interests are blocking scientists and investigators from getting information they need to combat the problem.

Trump’s proposed H-2A rules would harm, not help, U.S. farm workers and reduce protections for both domestic and foreign field laborers Jocelyn Sherman United Farm Workers July 26, 2019

Struggle for control

Yes, America is rigged against workers Steven Greenhouse New York Times August 3, 2019 (Opinion)
“No other industrial country treats its working class so badly. And there’s one big reason for that.”

Global Peace Index 2019

Vision of Humanity

The average level of global peacefulness improved very slightly in 2019, for the first time in five years, on the 2019 GPI. [However,] the average level of global peacefulness has deteriorated by 3.78 per cent since 2008. Over that period, 81 countries deteriorated in peacefulness, while 81 improved.

The global economic impact of violence improved for the first time since 2012, decreasing by 3.3 per cent or $475 billion from 2017 to 2018. The improvement in the global economic impact of violence is largely due to the decrease in the impact of Armed Conflict particularly in Iraq, Colombia and Ukraine, where the impact of Armed Conflict decreased by 29 per cent to $672 billion in 2017. The global economic impact of violence was $14.1 trillion PPP [ a measure of GDP which takes account of differences in the purchasing power of various currencies; see Wikipedia] in 2018, equivalent to 11.2 per cent of global GDP or $1,853 per person. Syria, Afghanistan and the Central African Republic incurred the largest economic cost of violence in 2018 as a percentage of their GDP, equivalent to 67, 47 and 42 per cent of GDP, respectively. In the ten countries most affected by violence, the average economic cost was equivalent to 35 per cent of GDP, compared to 3.3 per cent in the ten least affected.

The gap between the least and most peaceful countries continues to grow. Since 2008, the 25 least peaceful countries declined on average by 11 per cent, while the 25 most peaceful countries improved by 1.8 per cent on average. Conflict in the Middle East has been the key driver of the global deterioration in peacefulness. The indicator with the most widespread deterioration globally was the terrorism impact indicator. Just over 63 per cent of countries recorded increased levels of terrorist activity. However, the number of deaths from terrorism has been falling globally since 2014.

An estimated 971 million people live in areas with high or very high climate change exposure [where climate change issues such as water scarcity can increase the probability of conflict], . Of this number, 400 million (41 per cent) reside in countries with already low levels of peacefulness.

Access the full report.

Oppression and Exploitation News July 25 – 31

Opposing oppression, injustice 2019

The four ordinary people who took on big pharma Beth Macy New York Times July 20, 2019 (Opinion)
“They tried to warn us about the dangers of OxyContin. Almost two decades later, we’re finally listening.”

Struggle for control 2019

Turkey’s ruling party is splintering. Here’s why. Yunus Orhan and Ora John Reuter Washington Post July 18, 2019 (Analysis)
“Defections could be a bigger threat to Erdogan’s rule than the recent election losses.”

Philippine Vice President, a Duterte foe, is charged in plot against him Jason Gutierrez New York Times July 19, 2019
“The charges against the 36 people, including Vice President Leni Robredo, several senators and Catholic officials, are aimed at those who have been sharply critical of Mr. Duterte’s war on drugs and other actions, like his crackdown on the news media.”

Opioid harm

Opioids have an important role in relieving pain. Nonetheless, opioids can cause serious harm: addiction to them can ruin lives. Thus they are a “controlled substance” where safeguards are—or should be—in place so they may be used only for serious pain relief. When these safeguards are breached, harm can be done to many people. This harm, and the responsibility for it, is a current critical issue in the United States.

The Washington Post has recently published an excellent series of articles on the opioid crisis, several of which are cited below.

This is a good introduction to the issue covering the scale of the problem, lawsuits over the issue, and the Post’s efforts to make the DEA’s opioid distribution database available to the public.
76 billion opioid pills: Newly released federal data unmasks the epidemic Scott Higham, Sari Horwitz and Steven Rich Washington Post July 16, 2019

Drilling into the DEA’s pain pill database Washington Post July 21, 2019
“From 2006 to 2012 there were 38,269,630 prescription pain pills, enough for 203 pills per person per year, supplied to Mingo County, W.Va.”

Opioid death rates soared in communities where pain pills flowed Sari Horwitz, Steven Rich and Scott Higham Washington Post July 16, 2019

Drug company executives said they didn’t contribute to the opioid epidemic. Nearly 2,000 communities say otherwise. Robert O’Harrow Jr. and Scott Higham Washington Post July 20, 2019

Shows the Post’s opioid epidemic articles over the past three years.
Follow The Post’s investigation of the opioid epidemic Washington Post Staff July 19, 2019