Conflict 2022

How the U.S. has struggled to stop the growth of a shadowy Russian private army Joaquin Sapien and Joshua Kaplan ProPublica May 27, 2022

David C. MacMichael, CIA whistleblower under Reagan, dies at 93 Harrison Smith Washington Post June 2, 2022
…a disillusioned CIA analyst who accused the Reagan administration of misrepresenting intelligence as part of an effort to overthrow the left-wing government of Nicaragua…

Ahead of Biden visit, Israel launches biggest eviction of Palestinians in decades Steve Hendrix and Shira Rubin Washington Post May 22, 2022

Report: Hunger reached record high in 2021, may worsen in 2022 Rumbi Chakamba Devex May 5, 2022
The 2022 “Global Report on Food Crises,” compiled by the Global Network Against Food Crises — an international alliance that includes the European Union, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the World Food Program — found that around 193 million people were acutely food-insecure and in need of urgent assistance across 53 countries and territories in 2021. That’s an increase of nearly 40 million people from 2020. Of most concern are the 570,000 million people facing starvation and death levels of hunger in Ethiopia, South Sudan, Southern Madagascar, and Yemen. 

The political economy of systemic U.S. militarism James M. Cypher Monthly Review April 1, 2022

Ukraine and Yemen wars highlight U.S.’s role as biggest arms dealer in the world Mike Ludwig Truthout April 15, 2020

Russians are told they have two choices: Win this war or be destroyed Leonid Ragozin Washington Post April 22, 2022
They justify Putin’s fratricide because the West, and ‘internal Ukrainians,’ present an existential threat.

Through child marriage or paid adoption, Afghan girls bear brunt of crisis Sudarsan Raghavan Washington Post April 14, 2022

How many Ukrainians have fled their homes and where have they gone? BBC News March 31, 2022
More than ten million people have now fled their homes in Ukraine because of the Russian invasion, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. As well as the four million who have left for neighboring countries, another estimated 6.5 million people are thought to be displaced inside the war-torn country itself.

War on Syria: Eleven years of carnage Baher Kamal Inter Press Service March 24, 2022

The cost of war: 23 million Afghans suffer acute hunger, 95% don’t eat enough food Baher Kamal Inter Press Service March 24, 2022

Rising hunger looms in Sudan, with little aid in sight Reuters/CNN April 1, 2022

Putin and Xi exposed the great illusion of capitalism John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge Bloomberg March 24, 2022 (Opinion)
Unless the U.S. and its allies mobilize to save it, the second great age of globalization is coming to a catastrophic close.

NATO and the road not taken Rajan Menon Boston Review March 16, 2022
Condemning Putin’s war must go hand in hand with imagining a more just security order.

Regarding war crimes, Russian and American Joseph Scalice World Socialist Web Site March 11, 2022 Ukraine, Saudi Arabia and the hypocrisy of imperialism Patrick Martin World Socialist Web Site March 14, 2022

Diplomacy—and a neutral Ukraine—still best path to peace: experts Julia Conley Common Dreams March 9, 2022
“Pursuing diplomacy is not appeasement; it is prudence, and it could save Ukraine and the world from an unmitigated catastrophe,” argues Columbia University’s Jeffrey D. Sachs.

As more than 2 million flee Ukraine, some nations face scrutiny over response to refugee crisis Chantal Da Silva NBC News March 9, 2022
As many as 4 million people could be forced to flee violence in Ukraine, the United Nations refugee agency has said.

Concerns over impact of Russian sanctions on global financial system Nick Beams World Socialist Web Site March 6, 2022

So this Is what it looks like when the corporate media opposes a war Jeff Cohen Common Dreams February 28, 2022
Major American media outlets oppose military aggression… unless the United States is doing it.

Respond to Putin’s illegal invasion of Ukraine with diplomacy, not war Phyllis Bennis Foreign Policy in Focus February 22, 2022 There’s no “national interest” worth risking nuclear conflict. But real diplomacy—and Russia’s own antiwar movement—could stop the suffering.

How South Sudan’s peace process became a motor for violence Joshua Craze New Humanitarian February 3, 2022
But analysts, conflict monitoring groups, and local residents say the peace agreement has in fact caused a significant escalation in violence, as commanders and politicians compete for power in a transitional government based in the capital, Juba, by fighting wars in the peripheries – conflicts that international actors, including a billion-dollar UN mission in the country, and the United Nations Security Council, which has sanctioned South Sudan, often chalk down to communities fighting each other.

Afghanistan faces widespread hunger amid worsening humanitarian crisis Ruby Mellen and Júlia Ledur Washington Post January 24, 2022
Since the fall of Kabul in August and the withdrawal of U.S. troops, the Taliban-controlled government has been choked off from the international economy, resulting in a currency crisis, extensive poverty and the collapse of key public services such as health care. “Yes, it was terrible prior to August,” Aken [Afghanistan director of the International Rescue Committee] said. ″But when the development funding was cut off on Aug. 15 and the sanctions were imposed and the assets frozen, that really took the situation from very bad to an extreme.”

When will the U.S. stop lying to itself about global politics? Peter Beinhart New York Times January 13, 2022 (opinion)
While the U.S. says that Russia should not have a “sphere of influence” on its borders, the U.S. has maintained a sphere of influence in the Americas by force and other means since the Monroe Doctrine until today.

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