Banner Photo Captions

Banner photo 1: Beneficiaries waiting in line to collect their ration at a food-distribution taking place at the UNMISS compound in Malakal, Upper Nile State, South Sudan (May 2014) Credit: ©Jacob Zocherman/IRIN
Banner photo 1: Beneficiaries waiting in line to collect their ration at a food-distribution taking place at the UNMISS compound in Malakal, Upper Nile State, South Sudan (May 2014) Credit: ©Jacob Zocherman/IRIN

©Jacob Zocherman/IRIN

Armed Dinka tribesmen in Rumbek, South Sudan. Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash
Banner photo 2. Armed Dinka tribesmen in Rumbek, South Sudan. Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash

Credit: Randy Fath on Unsplash

Banner photo 3: People gather in San Salvador awaiting the canonization of Archbishop Romero by Pope Francis at the Vatican. A pastor, then martyr for his people made a saint. Credit: Cam Ventoza
Banner photo 3: People gather in San Salvador awaiting the canonization of Archbishop Romero by Pope Francis at the Vatican. A pastor, then martyr for his people, made a saint. Credit: Cam Ventoza

Credit: Cam Ventoza

Boy searching in trash for food or something he can sell to help support his family in Nicaragua, May 2017. Does the fact that many in the world have so little have anything to do with exploitation? Credit: Hermes Rivera on Unsplash
Banner photo 4. Boy searching in trash for food or something he can sell to help support his family in Nicaragua, May 2017. Does the fact that many in the world have so little have anything to do with exploitation? Credit: Hermes Rivera on Unsplash

Credit:  Hermes Rivera on Unsplash

In the United States, strong anti-Irish sentiment began in the late 1840’s, when the great Irish famine caused many to emigrate to the United States, and continued into the 20th century. Anti-Catholic prejudice was present in the presidential election of 1960, but did not prevent John F. Kennedy, a Catholic, from being elected. Credit: unknown
Banner photo 5. In the United States, strong anti-Irish sentiment began in the late 1840’s, when the great Irish famine caused many to emigrate to the United States, and continued into the 20th century. Anti-Catholic prejudice was present in the presidential election of 1960, but did not prevent John F. Kennedy, a Catholic, from being elected. Credit: unknown
Leaders at the head of the August, 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, including Martin Luther King, John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph and Walter Reuther. Credit: U.S. Information Agency
Banner photo 6. Leaders of the August, 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, including Martin Luther King, John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph and Walter Reuther. Credit: U.S. Information Agency

Credit: U.S. Information Agency

“NO DOGS, NEGROES, MEXICANS.” Lonestar Restaurant Association, Dallas, Texas. Printed “Jim Crow” sign, n.d. Black History Collection, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Banner photo 7. “NO DOGS, NEGROES, MEXICANS.” Lonestar Restaurant Association, Dallas, Texas. Printed “Jim Crow” sign, n.d. Black History Collection, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00) http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/images/cr0024_enlarge.jpg

Jim Crow laws mandating the separation of the races in practically every aspect of public life were systematically instituted in the South beginning in the 1890s. Water fountains, restaurants, theaters, restrooms, stores, buses, trains, workplaces, and other public facilities were typically designated with “White Only” and “Colored” signs. The Lonestar Restaurant Association based in Dallas distributed this sign to its members to hang in the windows of their restaurants, where American Indians, Mexicans, and African Americans were subjected to Jim Crow laws and racial discrimination. These types of laws existed until the 1960s. https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/segregation-era.html

Sana'a, Yemen. Ali, 13 years old, stands in the middle of destroyed buildings in his neighborhood.
Banner photo 8. Sana’a, Yemen. Ali, 13 years old, stands in the middle of destroyed buildings in his neighborhood. Credit International Committee of the Red Cross V-P-YE-E-01804

Credit: International Committee of the Red Cross

The Women's March was a worldwide protest on January 21, 2017, the day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The main protest, shown here, was in Washington, D.C.
Banner photo 9. The Women’s March was a worldwide protest on January 21, 2017, the day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The main protest, shown here, was in Washington, D.C.

CredIt: Mobilus in Mobili

WAPATO, WASHINGTON - 8JULY15 - Sara N. Sanchez de Lustre thins fruit on red delicious apple trees, so that the remaining apples will grow to a large size. Copyright David Bacon
Banner photo 10. WAPATO, WASHINGTON – 8 JULY 2015 – Sara N. Sanchez de Lustre thins fruit on red delicious apple trees, so that the remaining apples will grow to a large size. Copyright: David Bacon

Copyright: David Bacon

Siqueiros mural "America Tropical"
Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros began the mural era in Los Angeles in 1932 with his painting of “America Tropical” on the south façade of the second story of the Italian Hall in El Pueblo. The mural depicts a native crucified on a double cross, with what the artist called an “American imperialist eagle” stretching out its talons above him. Siqueiros stated that the mural represented “the destruction of past American national cultures . . . by the invaders of both yesterday and today.” Credit (Creative Commons): The City Project

Credit (Creative Commons): The City Project