Monthly Archives: April 2017

National March for Education Santiago, Chile Credit: Frans Vicencio

Protests sweeping South America show rising antigovernment anger

Nick Miroff, Washington Post April 17, 2017. Nearly every nation in South America has been jolted by large protests or violent clashes in recent weeks, a continental surge of anti-government anger unlike anything in years. On the streets of Venezuela, opponents of the left-wing government are squaring off against riot police nearly every day. In Paraguay, angry crowds sacked and firebombed the country’s parliament building after lawmakers tried to alter presidential term limits. Powerful unions in Argentina crippled the country’s transportation networks this month with a general strike.  See full story.

Picture caption: National March for Education on April 11, 2017 in Santiago, Chile. Credit:  ©©Frans  Vicencio

Nogoi Njie - the last person to see Solo Sandeng before he died. Credit: Jason Florio/IRIN

“The right side of history” Gambians seek justice after Jammeh’s fall

Lois Hunt, IRIN  April 13, 2017. A year ago, opposition activist Solo Sandeng led the first march in over decade to call for free elections in Gambia. Although the demonstration was a catalyst for the ouster of autocrat Yahya Jammeh, it cost Sandeng his life. See full story.

Photo caption: Nogoi Njie – the last person to see Solo Sandeng before he died. A year ago, opposition activist Solo Sandeng led the first march in over decade to call for free elections in Gambia. Although the demonstration was a catalyst for the ouster of autocrat Yahya Jammeh, it cost Sandeng his life. Credit:  Jason Florio/IRIN

 

The April Issue of Dollars and Sense, which contains this article. Credit: Dollars and Sense

Globalization and the end of the labor aristocracy

Jayati Ghosh, Dollars and Sense, March/April 2017.  Twenty-first century imperialism has changed its form. In the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, it was explicitly related to colonial control; in the second half of the 20th century it relied on a combination of geopolitical and economic control deriving also from the clear dominance of the United States as the global hegemon and leader of the capitalist world (dealing with the potential threat from the Communist world). It now relies more and more on an international legal and regulatory architecture—fortified by various multilateral and bilateral agreements—to establish the power of capital over labor.   See full article.

Why Americans vote against their interests: Partisanship

Amanda Taub, New York Times,  April 12, 2017.  Working-class Americans who voted for Donald J. Trump continue to approve of him as president, even though he supported a health care bill that would disproportionately hurt them.  Highly educated professionals tend to lean Democratic, even though Republican tax policies would probably leave more money in their pockets. Why do people vote against their economic interests? See full NYT story.

Photo caption: Anti-Obamacare demonstrators. Americans For Prosperity rally on the south side of the Capitol, March 12, 2012.  Credit: ©© Maljunznk

 

Two children walk out of their shelter in Dablual in Mayendit County on March 23. Hundreds of people have recently fled Dablual, still under control of opposition troops, because of ongoing fighting and the food crisis. Credit: Albert Gonzalez Farran/The Washington Post

Starving to death: How wars have left 20 million on the brink

Max Bearak and Laris Karklis Washington Post, April 10, 2017

Our world produces enough food to feed all its inhabitants. When one region is suffering severe hunger, global humanitarian institutions, though often cash-strapped, are theoretically capable of transporting food and averting catastrophe. But this year, South Sudan slipped into famine, and Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen are each on the verge of their own. Famine now threatens 20 million people — more than at any time since World War II. As defined by the United Nations, famine occurs when a region’s daily hunger-related death rate exceeds 2 per 10,000 people. See full story

Note:  Conflict arises when one group wants to overthrow the existing government in order to take control of the government and use, to substantial degree, the resources that the government has for its own ends.

Caption and credit for above photo: Two children walk out of their shelter in Dablual in Mayendit County on March 23. Hundreds of people have recently fled Dablual, still under control of opposition troops, because of ongoing fighting and the food crisis. Credit: Albert Gonzalez Farran/The Washington Post